Carnegie Mellon University (the Language Technologies Institute, School of Computer Science): Professor Eric Nyberg and Matthias Grabmair lead the research and graduate students working on automating argument mining in legal texts. They have co-authored articles with members of the LLT Lab related to this topic.

Cornell University (Legal Information Institute): Thomas R. Bruce, the Director of Cornell’s LII, leads a team that is collaborating with the LLT Lab, the University of Pittsburgh, and Carnegie Mellon to develop the veterans claims project.

Hofstra University (Digital Research Center): John Bryant, Director of the DRC and of the Melville Electronic Library, is the founder of the DRC and a collaborator with the LLT Lab on its online library of Reasoning Structures in Legal Texts (RSLT). This project is part of the Lab’s research into online education.

Massachusetts Institute of Technology (Digital Humanities, HyperStudio) provides the platform for the Lab’s online library of Reasoning Structures in Legal Texts (RSLT). The Lab has worked with the MIT personnel in upgrading MIT’s Annotation Studio framework to meet the needs of this project. This project is part of the Lab’s research into online education.

Scuola Superiore Sant’Anna, Pisa, Italy (Lider Lab): Professor Giovanni Comandè, the Director of the Lider Lab, is collaborating with the LLT Lab to develop software analytics for a Lider-Lab database that monitors Italian judicial and administrative decisions applying European consumer protection law.

University of Pittsburgh (the Intelligent Systems Program, the Learning Research & Development Center, and the School of Law): Professor Kevin D. Ashley, an internationally recognized expert on computer modeling of legal reasoning and cyberspace legal issues, leads a team of collaborators that works with the LLT Lab on automating argument mining in legal texts. Professor Ashley has co-authored numerous articles with members of the LLT Lab.