“Semantic Types for Computational Legal Reasoning: Propositional Connectives and Sentence Roles in the Veterans’ Claims Dataset,” co-authored with Ji Hae Han, Xiang Ni, and Kaneyasu Yoseda, and presented at the 16th International Conference on Artificial Intelligence & Law (ICAIL 2017), held in London, UK, June 12-16, 2017.

“Semantic Types for Decomposing Evidence Assessment in Decisions on Veterans’ Disability Claims for PTSD,” co-authored with Ashtyn Hemendinger, Nneka Okpara, and Tauseef Ahmed, and presented at the Second Workshop on Automated Detection, Extraction and Analysis of Semantic Information in Legal Texts (ASAIL 2017), held in conjunction with the 16th International Conference on Artificial Intelligence & Law (ICAIL 2017), in London, UK, on June 16, 2017.

“Content Analytics for Jurists,” presentation at the Scuola Superiore Sant’Anna (Sant’Anna School of Advanced Studies), in Pisa, Italy, April 29, 2016.

“Argument Mining from Legal Texts,” presentation at the Scuola Superiore Sant’Anna (Sant’Anna School of Advanced Studies), in Pisa, Italy, April 26, 2016.

“The need for annotated corpora from legal documents, and for (human) protocols for creating them: The attribution problem,” presentation as part of the Dagstuhl seminar on “Natural Language Argumentation: Mining, Processing, and Reasoning over Textual Arguments,” held at Schloss Dagstuhl in Wadern, Germany, April 17-22, 2016.

“Argumentation Mining from Judicial Decisions: The Attribution Problem and the Need for Legal Discourse Models,” presentation at the 2015 Workshop on Automated Detection, Extraction and Analysis of Semantic Information in Legal Texts (ASAIL 2015), held in conjunction with the 15th International Conference on Artificial Intelligence & Law (ICAIL 2015), in San Diego, June 8-12, 2015.

“Introducing LUIMA: An Experiment in Legal Conceptual Retrieval of Vaccine Injury Decisions using a UIMA Type System and Tools,” co-authored with Matthias Grabmair, Kevin D. Ashley, Ran Chen, Preethi Sureshkumar, Chen Wang, and Eric Nyberg, and presented by Matthias Grabmair at the 15th International Conference on Artificial Intelligence & Law (ICAIL 2015), held in San Diego, June 8-12, 2015.

“Annotating Patterns of Reasoning about Medical Theories of Causation in Vaccine Cases: Toward a Type System for Arguments,” presentation, co-authored with Karina Vazirova and Cass Sanford, at the First Workshop on Argumentation Mining, held at the 52nd Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics, in Baltimore, Maryland, June 26, 2014.

“The Logical Structures of Science-Based Reasoning,” presentation at the City of New York Administrative Judicial Institute, part of the Office of Administrative Trials and Hearings (OATH), on May 26, 2015.

“Computational Representation of Legal Reasoning at the Law-Fact Interface,” presentation at the 2014 Stanford Symposium on Law and Rationality: “Trial with and without Mathematics: Legal, Philosophical and Computational Perspectives,” held at Stanford University, on May 30, 2014.

“The Vaccine/Injury Project (V/IP) Corpus,” presentation at the Fifth Workshop on Semantic Processing of Legal Texts (SPLeT-2014), as part of the Ninth Language Resources and Evaluation Conference (LREC 2014), held in Reykjavik, Iceland, on May 26-31, 2014.

“From Information Retrieval (IR) to Argument Retrieval (AR) for Legal Cases: Report on a Baseline Study,” co-authored with Kevin D. Ashley, presentation by Kevin Ashley at the 26th International Conference on Legal Knowledge and Information Systems (JURIX 2013), held in Bologna, Italy, on December 11-13, 2013.

“The Research Laboratory for Law, Logic & Technology,” presentation at the Hofstra Digital Research Center Forum on “Digital Thinking / Critical Thinking,” held at Hofstra University on October 25, 2013.

“Legal Reasoning Models,” presentation at the MIDAS Workshop on Engaging Computational Methods for Public Health Law & Policy, held in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, on October 7-8, 2013.

“Logic and Legal Reasoning,” presentation at the Logic Across the Disciplines Conference, held at James Madison University, on September 13, 2013. Video is available (advance through the playlist to Walker presentation).

“Toward Constructing Evidence-Based Legal Arguments Using Legal Decision Documents and Machine Learning,” co-authored with Kevin D. Ashley, presentation at the 14th International Conference on Artificial Intelligence and Law (ICAIL 2013), held in Rome, Italy, on June 10-14, 2013.

“Representing the Use of Rule-Based Presumptions in Legal Decision Documents,” presentation at the Workshop on Formal Argument and Evidential Inference, held in Rome, Italy, on June 14, 2013, as part of the 14th International Conference on Artificial Intelligence and Law (ICAIL 2013).

“The Research Laboratory for Law, Logic & Technology,” presentation at the Workshop on Educational Applications of Computer-Supported Argumentation Tools, conducted by the University of Pittsburgh’s Learning Research & Development Center, held at the University of Pittsburgh, on May 8-10, 2013.

“The Research Laboratory for Law, Logic and Technology (LLT Lab),” presentation at The Twelfth International Conference on Substantive Technology in Legal Education and Practice (SubTech 2012), hosted by New York Law School, in New York City on July 26-28, 2012.

“A Process Approach to Inferences of Causation: Empirical Research from Vaccine Cases in the United States,” co-authored with Chan Hee Park, Philip H. Hwang, Arthur John, Evgeny I. Krasnov, and Keith Langlais, presentation at the Third International Conference on Quantitative Justice and Fairness, held in Lisbon, Portugal, on May 22-24, 2012.

“Meaning, Logic, and the Systematization of Law: Kelsen, Wittgenstein and Information Architecture,” presentation at the Workshop on Fundamental Concepts and the Systematization of Law, part of the 24th International Conference on Legal Knowledge and Information Systems (JURIX 2011), held in Vienna, Austria, on 14-16 December 2011. Copy of full text available for download in .pdf format

“Empirically Quantifying Evidence Assessment in Legal Decisions,” presentation at the Second International Conference on Quantitative Aspects of Justice and Fairness, held on 25-26 February 2011 in Fiesole, near Florence, Italy. The conference was hosted by the European University Institute.

“Plausibility Schemas: Templates for Legal Factfinding,” presentation at the 12th International Conference on Artificial Intelligence and Law (ICAIL 2009), at the Autonomous University of Barcelona, 9 June 2009, Barcelona, Spain.

“Designing Factfinding for Cross-Border Healthcare,” presentation at the international workshop “Medical liability and medical accidents compensation: From the blame game to individual rights protection in the provision of medical services,” at the Scuola Superiore Sant’Anna, 6 June 2009, Pisa, Italy.

“Assessing the Probative Value of Evidence,” a four-day seminar course at the Scuola Superiore Sant’Anna, 7 & 11-13 May 2009, Pisa, Italy.

“Building Legal Reasoning Trees,” a four-day seminar course at the Scuola Superiore Sant’Anna, 4-6 & 14 May 2009, Pisa, Italy.

“Visualizing Legal Reasoning: Using Logic, Graphics, and Computers in Representing Knowledge and Constructing Arguments,” presentation/workshop to the Legal Service of the European Commission, 22 March 2007, Brussels, Belgium.

“Visualizing Legal Reasoning: Pedagogical Implications,” faculty workshop at the University of San Diego Law School, 9 March 2007, San Diego, California.

“Visualizing the Dynamics around the Rule/Evidence Interface in Legal Reasoning,” presentation at the conference on “Graphic and Visual Representations of Evidence and Inference in Legal Settings,” sponsored by the Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law/Yeshiva University, 28-29 January 2007, New York, New York.

“A Default-Logic Framework for Legal Reasoning in Multiagent Systems,” presentation at the 2006 Fall Symposium of the American Association for Artificial Intelligence, as part of a symposium on “Interaction and Emergent Phenomena in Societies of Agents,” 12-15 October 2006, Arlington, Virginia.

“A Default-Logic Model of Factfinding for United States Regulation of Food Safety,” invited presentation at a Workshop on “Uncertain Risks Regulated: National, EU and International Regulatory Models Compared,” held at Maastricht University, 11-12 February 2005, in Maastricht, The Netherlands.