BVA1413417: Present Disability (PTSD)

Citation Nr: 1413417 Decision Date: 03/28/14 Archive Date: 04/08/14 DOCKET NO. 93-13 862

FINDINGS OF FACT …

3. The appellant has not been diagnosed with PTSD, and an acquired psychiatric disorder other than PTSD has not been shown to have begun during service, been aggravated by service, or have otherwise resulted from the appellant’s military service.

CONCLUSIONS OF LAW …

3. Criteria for service connection for an acquired psychiatric disorder, to include PTSD, have not been met. 38 U.S.C.A. § 1110 (West 2002); 38 C.F.R. §§ 3.303, 3.304 (2013).

REASONS AND BASES FOR FINDINGS AND CONCLUSIONS …

While the appellant has filed a claim seeking PTSD, and has submitted a number of documents describing the military’s efforts to address psychiatric combat trauma, the appellant has not actually presented any evidence to show that he has actually been diagnosed with PTSD, or even if he has, that it is in anyway related to his military service.

The appellant in several of his lengthy statements has suggested that several training exercises for ROTC were stressful, or that he was treated unfairly during service. He also states studying combat tactics in ROTC classes and participating in training exercises was the same as stressors veterans in combat experience. Even if such incidents were stressful to him, a diagnosis of PTSD would need to be based upon such an incident. Here, no such diagnosis is present. Of note, a number of psychiatric treatment records have been obtained, including from the appellant’s psychiatric hospitalization in December 1990 and January 1991, but the records simply do not show that PTSD was ever diagnosed.

To the extent the appellant believes that he has PTSD from service, he lacks the medical training and expertise to address a complex medical question such as diagnosing a specific psychiatric disability. See Jandreau v. Nicholson, 492 F. 3d 1372 (Fed. Cir. 2007). Accordingly, the appellant’s claim for PTSD is therefore denied.

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